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Moral, social, public and political implications of "Even in death, I still serve"?

HeavyArmor

Trust me, I'm a Tech-Priest
Author
Recently there's news regarding scientist making some progress in restoring/preserving cellular functions of recently deceased animals......

Which lead me to think...... what if......

One day in near future, we achieve breakthrough in this technology, and capable of applying this practically in the field, resurrecting recently deceased veteran warfighters (those who had an intact brain left, so to speak)?

The idea is this:
  1. During recruitment stage, fresh volunteers/recruits were offered an option to be resurrected if deceased.
  2. If they choose so, they shall sign a contract of agreement. (which can be rescinded before ones' unfortunate passing, should the change of mind occurs)
  3. The agreement contract would rendered void and invalid should one reach retirement age or was honorably/dishonorably discharged.
  4. But, if one dies in active duty after a decade or more in active service, the terms come to effect.
  5. The deceased warfighter would then be rushed to a sufficiently advance hospital to undergo the procedure.
  6. The warfighter's cerebral would be resurrected, and be transplanted to a new mechanical/cybernetic platform with life-support gear.
    1. Exact platform varies from a front-line combat platform, to a training facility administrative mainframe, or anything in between.
  7. Upon successful ascendance, the reborn individuals would serve according to their contracts for another 20 years in military active service, either imparting their experience in training new recruits, or fighting in front with superior experience.
  8. Such individuals will be granted triple their original salary and any benefits their service entitles (they can also choose to transfer their salaries to beloved ones), and they are allowed to meet/talk/contact with anyone (including their families and close ones) freely during non-deployment hours.
  9. Upon completion of 20 years of service, each individual could choose one of the following path:
    1. Granting peace, joining the ancestors in heaven.
    2. Continue to serve in active duty, until the cerebral finally expires or the individual changes his/her/its mind.
    3. Retire from active duty, and reassigned to government civil service, until the cerebral finally expires or the individual changes his/her/its mind.

So how do you think the public would respond to such an initiative? or what kind of moral, social, and political implications would this initiative bring?
 

Shadow Arxxy

Active member
I don't think it would be even remotely cost effective to field a combat-capable life support platform for a mere 20 years of additional service, plus you're going to have epic issues with body dysphoria for any platform other than a humanoid body which is highly similar to the wearer's original body. What makes Dreadnoughts pay off in setting is that they are extraordinarily potent combat platforms which can serve for an indefinite period of time, amassing literally centuries of experience. The proposed setup has neither of those advantages.
 

HeavyArmor

Trust me, I'm a Tech-Priest
Author
I don't think it would be even remotely cost effective to field a combat-capable life support platform for a mere 20 years of additional service, plus you're going to have epic issues with body dysphoria for any platform other than a humanoid body which is highly similar to the wearer's original body. What makes Dreadnoughts pay off in setting is that they are extraordinarily potent combat platforms which can serve for an indefinite period of time, amassing literally centuries of experience. The proposed setup has neither of those advantages.
Actually they serve more than 20 years, it's just that their contract mandates 20 years of service. After fulfilling the terms of service, he/she/it is free to choose what to do next. They could serve for another century until their organic systems finally failed if they so wished.
 

IndyFront

Yokkiziikzekker
Author
What if one were to apply that to an entire populace instead of just warfighters/soldiers?
 

Vashon

Active member
Banned
If the suits are that good, then is it really death? Why wouldn't they just finish out their normal contract, and only have people who sign for the 20 year contracts receive this benefit? Also, there wouldn't be that many people on this any way, not to the most extreme degree. You would just have an ever increasing scale of prosthetics. Even then, only the most horrifically injured could or would be reduced to just a brain without a body, since its extremely hard to find that kind of damage that doesn't also destroy the brain.
 

StolenMadWolf

Active member
Whilst the tech does sound amazing... being tied to an military organisation that you might not support by the time of ‘death’ is not really moral to me... or rather, seems a tad suspicious. I imagine some would still do it, albeit not as many as you would think.

Forget Dreadnaughts, this sounds like something straight out of the Legion of the Damned. The sci-fi French Foreign Legion successor, not the 40K one.
 

Mondor

The Freak
Banned
How would their families react? Would some of the soldiers want to die?


I'm reminded of a lore tidbit relating to Star Wars Battlefront 2 (2005) stating that a lot of the Dark Trooper Phase 0s were actually soldiers from the Clone Wars that were heavily wounded and later ended up killing themselves after becoming little more than living weapons.
 

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