What's new
Frozen In Carbonite

Welcome to FiC! Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

On a Knife's Edge, a Post Weltkrieg 2 Kaiserreich Japan Game

christopher_sni

Active member
[X] Plan Security

The Great Tokyo Fire of 1953
[X] National building standards and fire safety standards should be imposed nationwide and in all sphere members. Historical and cultural buildings would be preserved and modernized if possible. The national government would provide grants to local governments for the upgrades to community and government buildings.

Canal Zone Blues
[X] As a recognition of Egypt's willingness to help with the Refugee Crisis the profits from the Suez Canal shall be split 50/50.

The Mirage and The Kestrel
[X] We should develop a multi purpose fighter not only for defensive purposes but for export to friendly countries.

[X] Fate of the Tokko, and matters of the secret police.
Domestic law enforcement should be given to civilian police agencies.

[X] PSIA Operations (we need to expand our intelligence services)
[X] The West Indies (more ways to keep an eye on the Union and sell our goods)
[X] Occupied by UN negotiations
[X] Occupied by Tanegashima Island Space Site Construction.
 

King Kūruš

Active member
When choosing what kind of fighter we'll need, we must again consider the nature of the 3rd Weltkrieg, which is one where we'll likely be in a quality disadvantage, fuel advantage, and then a geographical advantage/disadvantage against the Internationale.

Our airforce's quality disadvantage should be self-explanatory. Our technological and economic base, not to mention the max amount of intellectual resources that can be put into aviation research, should remain smaller than the Internationale's for quite a time. Whatever fighter we can develop and put into mass production, it will likely be at least a generation behind the Internationale's. We must compensate that by looking at the advantages at hand, or try to see how we can make some disadvantages into advantages.

With regards to fuel....the CPS has a ridiculousy large fuel advantage, due to owning most of the world's oil deposits, and we should exploit this fact by making our air force focus on things that the Internationale cannot afford or sacrifice as much, which is less fuel efficient airframes, larger max potential of plane numbers, longer range, and most importantly, much higher training times. And if the Internationale tries to put more focus on war stockpiles fuel, that would come at the cost of their civilian industries. Our fuel resource advantage is a centre piece in our strategy to overcome the Internationale in any kind of conflict, may it be a hot one or a cold one.

Now, with geography, this interesting as there are both pros and cons with it. On one hand, at the main frontline, the airbases built there should be noticeably worse than the Internationale's, both quality and quantity wise, as the terrain we will be putting them would be our choice of an underdeveloped desert or an underdeveloped steppe/tundra. Dust and snow storms would be frequent here, causing maintenance to be much higher than the Internationale's, and also, due to the fact it most of these places will be flat ground till we reach the Urals and the Persian mountains, they'd be far more difficult to hide, far more easier to bomb, if we decide to fight the air war so close to the frontline. That said, the drier weather in these parts means that radar and in turn SAMs would be quite effective, so if the main frontline is mainly a defensive one, which I personally believe should be our strategy, developing long range multi purpose fighters meant to take off in very bad conditions concentrated mostly in Iran and behind the Urals, with a large amount of SAMs to help tip the scales to our favour.

We should also remember that the far important war theatre would be the sea war, thus the development of V/STOL technologies for the purpose of carrier warfare will be quite necessary.

While I have said a lot of things, I don't actually know much about the specific specs of historical weapons of war in general, so just take what I said in consideration when choosing the kind of fighter the CPS should develop. From my pop knowledge, I guess a fighter more like the Harrier with the robust reliable design philosophy the Soviets had would be the best kind of fighter for the CPS, I think.
 

Durabys

A Cheshire Exile
While I have said a lot of things, I don't actually know much about the specific specs of historical weapons of war in general, so just take what I said in consideration when choosing the kind of fighter the CPS should develop. From my pop knowledge, I guess a fighter more like the Harrier with the robust reliable design philosophy the Soviets had would be the best kind of fighter for the CPS, I think.
I actually agree. We need to go full STOL/VTOL for all our air gear. We can then have universal airforce frames for our Carriers and ground forces. No need to make special versions for the Navy. Besides. A full STOL/VTOL air force would allow us to make a much larger number of aircraft carrying ships: What is better? Having 40+ Super Carriers, each that can be downed with two to three hits of an Exocet missile (Oh. God. The French are founders of the Comintern here...the Exocet will be hypersonic in this timeline and nuke armed. Fuck my life.)? Or having 200+ smaller escort carriers?
 

Durabys

A Cheshire Exile
Another thing? @Rufus Shinra can back me on this: Stealth and Speed suck. The French OTL developed sensor suits in the late 90s that beat the B2 and F117. Also, missiles can be made always faster than any aircraft. because a bigger part of the frame of the missile can be made into a fuel/engine block than in any possible aircraft configuration.

What modern air wargaming found out is that Manuevertability is more important than Stealth which in itself more important than Speed. Our airframes should be first maneuverable (VTOL and STOL are ultimate maneuver platforms), then have a few stealth features here and there and only then the engineers should concentrate on increasing speed.
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
I actually agree. We need to go full STOL/VTOL for all our air gear. We can then have universal airforce frames for our Carriers and ground forces. No need to make special versions for the Navy. Besides. A full STOL/VTOL air force would allow us to make a much larger number of aircraft carrying ships: What is better? Having 40+ Super Carriers, each that can be downed with two to three hits of an Exocet missile (Oh. God. The French are founders of the Comintern here...the Exocet will be hypersonic in this timeline and nuke armed. Fuck my life.)? Or having 200+ smaller escort carriers?
Another thing? @Rufus Shinra can back me on this: Stealth and Speed suck. The French OTL developed sensor suits in the late 90s that beat the B2 and F117. Also, missiles can be made always faster than any aircraft. because a bigger part of the frame of the missile can be made into a fuel/engine block than in any possible aircraft configuration.

What modern air wargaming found out is that Manuevertability is more important than Stealth which in itself more important than Speed. Our airframes should be first maneuverable (VTOL and STOL are ultimate maneuver platforms), then have a few stealth features here and there and only then the engineers should concentrate on increasing speed.
Remember, Rufus said that size matters at least within the late 20th century if we're talking performance, a VTOL/STOL aircraft would most definitely be smaller and less performance intensive (I mean, look at the dogfighting capabilities of the OTL Harrier or Yak 38), and developing a VTOL/STOL fighter with all the capabilities we wanted like the F-35 would be so incredibly cost intensive for the 1950s it would definitely not be worth it. Also, there's also the admiralty's lobbying here, forcing them to sacrifice all their catapult carriers would be a very hard sell for them, and would probably require decades of paper after paper explaining the benefits of such a plan to work.

Perhaps a mix of carrier ships like the OTL USA, like a combination of standard super carriers and LPD ships for an expanded Japanese Rikusentai could work well for the Japanese. We can also count on the help from other CPS nations in case we need to double or even triple the escort ships needed to protect our carriers.
 

Rufus Shinra

Well-known member
Another thing? @Rufus Shinra can back me on this: Stealth and Speed suck. The French OTL developed sensor suits in the late 90s that beat the B2 and F117. Also, missiles can be made always faster than any aircraft. because a bigger part of the frame of the missile can be made into a fuel/engine block than in any possible aircraft configuration.

What modern air wargaming found out is that Manuevertability is more important than Stealth which in itself more important than Speed. Our airframes should be first maneuverable (VTOL and STOL are ultimate maneuver platforms), then have a few stealth features here and there and only then the engineers should concentrate on increasing speed.
I'd say that in the context here, you're quite off-topic.

First, the radar that no-sells the B-2 is NOSTRADAMUS, and it's the size of a small town, not anything that can be used tactically nor give a firing solution. More like a 'guide planes to an intercept area hoping to see it' radar.

Afterwards, speed is very important in the missile age, as it both increases your missiles' range and decreases the enemy's. The effective range of a BVR missile is highly influenced by your target's top speed, since it's an energy game. As for stealth, first of all, the Fifties are the worst time ever to think about it, because design isn't good enough, computing capability is shit (the F-117 looked like a bad CGI plane because computing wasn't good enough to optimize more complex shapes for RCS at the time) and because the era's radar are perfect to counter VLO capability: all modern VLO is against band X, except the old radars were band L or the like, and these are inaccurate but give no fuck about fighter-sized VLO features.

Finally, VTOL/STOL planes are NOT the ultimate maneuver platform, by a very long shot. You ain't going to pull crazy stunts with a Harrier, just slow down slowly, then hover and move a bit up and down, which is worse than useless to do air combat. Same as the Cobra maneuver, which has exactly one tactical value, which is to try and mess with Doppler radars.
 

Durabys

A Cheshire Exile
I'd say that in the context here, you're quite off-topic.

First, the radar that no-sells the B-2 is NOSTRADAMUS, and it's the size of a small town, not anything that can be used tactically nor give a firing solution. More like a 'guide planes to an intercept area hoping to see it' radar.

Afterwards, speed is very important in the missile age, as it both increases your missiles' range and decreases the enemy's. The effective range of a BVR missile is highly influenced by your target's top speed, since it's an energy game. As for stealth, first of all, the Fifties are the worst time ever to think about it, because design isn't good enough, computing capability is shit (the F-117 looked like a bad CGI plane because computing wasn't good enough to optimize more complex shapes for RCS at the time) and because the era's radar are perfect to counter VLO capability: all modern VLO is against band X, except the old radars were band L or the like, and these are inaccurate but give no fuck about fighter-sized VLO features.

Finally, VTOL/STOL planes are NOT the ultimate maneuver platform, by a very long shot. You ain't going to pull crazy stunts with a Harrier, just slow down slowly, then hover and move a bit up and down, which is worse than useless to do air combat. Same as the Cobra maneuver, which has exactly one tactical value, which is to try and mess with Doppler radars.
Sorry. Why am I off-topic? We were discussing TCI's aerospace development, weren't we? And your points are great. I made mistakes and assumptions.
 

Rufus Shinra

Well-known member
Sorry. Why am I off-topic? We were discussing TCI's aerospace development, weren't we? And your points are great. I made mistakes and assumptions.
I meant that this stuff would be very far-off compared to the current time. Plus, the difference in geopolitics and positions should lead to very different development paths. The main appeal of VLO for the US was to counter the heavy use of SAM by the Soviet forces, for example.

At this time, I'd argue that everyone is trying to push the edge of the envelope in raw performance. We're going to see Mach 2 or Mach 3 planes, record-breaking on a monthly basis until the new doctrines are tested for real. Supersonic VTOL will be tested, atomic anti-air rockets, etc.

One of the first divergence points will be the naval air, as all three blocks have a large ocean front and carriers, so carrier battles will be a major design focus unlike OTL where the only potential one was during the Falklands and would have seen Harrier VS Skyhawk from one midget carrier on each side, a far cry from the Pacific War.
 

christopher_sni

Active member
So I have some questions for our Moderator:

1. How much oil does the Sphere produce/consume compared to the Union or the Syndicalists? I do not need exact numbers just do we produce any surplus, do we need to import or what?

2. Did the Sphere develop any alternate fuel programs during the last war and are they still working?

3. Are there any oil producing neutrals that are friendly towards us?

4. How developed are helicopters right now? Are they the same level as OTL?

Thoughts:
So my thinking is that we need three aircraft classes. 1) High Altitude Interceptors to hunt bombers/recon. 2) Air Superiority/Combat Patrol and 3) Short Range Close Air Support. The Kestrel fits the third class since it would be able to operate in a variety of conditions from small carriers for the Rikusentai to rough airfields in some proxy war. We can standardize some of the equipment and weapons between the three platforms to ease the logistics.
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
1. How much oil does the Sphere produce/consume compared to the Union or the Syndicalists? I do not need exact numbers just do we produce any surplus, do we need to import or what?
A ton, we produce way, way more oil than we could consume. But as all of Asia develops, consumption of oil is going to increase dramatically, we may have both Iran, Arabia, and Russia, but we are talking about the industrialization of both China and India, as well as the whole of SE Asia and the Middle East to supply all that oil.

Rapid industrialization mind you.

2. Did the Sphere develop any alternate fuel programs during the last war and are they still working?
Not really, during the early phases of the war, we have Indonesia on our side, and that supplied the oil. After the expansion period. We have both Russia and the Mideast to supply all our oil needs. Sure, experiments were done, but never to the scale of attempted fracking the Japanese tried doing in OTL.

3. Are there any oil producing neutrals that are friendly towards us?
The only ones I can think is Nigeria and that's it.

4. How developed are helicopters right now? Are they the same level as OTL?
25 October: The Kawasaki H-1, the first helicopter to enter Japanese Military service, was unveiled, production starts immediately.
Happened in 1952.
 

Alias

Bean Daddy
Moderator
[X] Plan Security
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
@christopher_sni. I noticed that, in your plans, you have one slot of action still available, do you want to leave that open?
 
1954, Turn 6 results

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
Stepped up efforts to modernize the entirety of the country.

The resistance from the locals, while initially fierce. Slowly petered out as news from Saitama slowly filtered out of the Tokyo metropole and into the rest of the country. While the people do love their old buildings, the vast majority of them are more than happy to move temporarily while the various local governments either tore down their houses and build new ones, or install new, modern fire safety systems for the buildings that are not complete lost causes. It's a hard path to tread, but a necessary one in order for lives to be saved and buildings to be made sufficient for modern living.

Some local governments also utilized asbestos for some of the buildings, citing it's cost effectiveness and ability to trap heat effectively. This is definitely a wise move and will not backfire in any way.

Canal Zone Negotiations end in deadlock.

While initial negotiations went well. There was an incident in which a staffer for one of the emissaries said something that was considered incredibly rude to the Egyptian representative. The staffer was immediately recalled to Tokyo, but the damage was already done. Egyptian authorities, once hearing of the incident, demanded that Egypt have 55% ownership stake in the canal zone, and negotiations ended up in a deadlock for the rest of the year.

VTOL and Supersonic efforts boosted by government money.

The existing fleet of jet fighters are relatively adequate, but their speed and performance is beginning to show. The J7 Shindens and Nakajima Kikkas of the Imperial Japanese Air Force could potentially be outmatched by the Mirages that the French Commune was building. While a ton of companies are building prototypes, the Mitsubishi prototype seems to be making the most headway. With their first efforts to build a fully domestic Jet Engine, supersonic jet engine mind you, making significant headway. IJAF staff are rather pleased with the Mitsubishi proposal the most, although it remains to be seen whose jet fighter would enter government service. Assuming even one of them was picked.

Of field offices and agents. PSIA expands it's operations.

The recent success of the PSIA in obtaining early blueprints of the Kestrel and the Mirage are all it needed for the government to boost the agency's funding for the next fiscal year. Field offices are established all across the CPS, and agents of varying nationalities are recruited in order to boost the effectiveness of Japan's intelligence network, it seems that the reach of the PSIA is being rapidly expanded day by day. Much to the misfortune of the Third Internationale.

Russian projects given the funding it needs.

Russia has a slew of projects that they inherited from the collapse of Savinkov's Russia. From a theoretical Anti Aircraft missile, to early projects of jet fighters from the bombed out ruins of Mikoyan Gurevich and Sukhoi, and even to some tanks. A lot of promising items for military use, not to mention the various Civilian projects that was left out as the Transamurite government consolidates power all over Eastern Russia. But, lack of funds seriously crippled any chance of that project seeing light, the Vladivostok, and later Ekaterinburg Government's efforts is to divert most of the wealth from the Russian Pacific coast into more inland territories, improving the regular person's life after the devastation of the war. While Japanese aid helped, there is only so much money to go around, and most projects lay in the dust.

At least until recently. The money Japan gives is not a lot, but it is enough to ensure that Russian military projects that are potentially in dire straits are given life. Surface to Air Missile projects are given priority, with researching supersonic jet fighters and interceptors being an important second priority.

A successful attempt into the Caribbean (you rolled a 20)

It came as a shock for many people, most shocking of all were the bigwigs in Tokyo, they did not expect such a warm welcome from the various Caribbean countries once Japanese diplomats started flying in. Sure, maybe some overtures into Puerto Rico may be rebuffed, but overtures and investments in Cuba would be welcomed, but from Haiti, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. All of these countries have received the Japanese willingness to invest and become a bigger presence in the Caribbean with bright eyes and bushy tails. Due to our initial obligations in East Asia, the money we offered isn't a lot, but the Caribbean countries still took it regardless.

There are also very angry outpourings from the American embassy in Tokyo once they heard news about our dealings in Puerto Rico and Cuba.

The UN established, and representatives are being sent.

It took many years of dealings and discussions, but with the building in Istanbul built, the structure of the United Nations is finally agreed upon.

There would be two 'houses' within the UN, a General Assembly and a Special Assembly, the General Assembly is a place where representatives from various countries would discuss, vote and talk over many matters of international importance, the resolutions they pass are non-binding of course, but could signal a trend within the world stage that needed to be addressed. While the Special Assembly is reserved for only 5 permanent members and 4 rotating members. 2 of them are France and the United Kingdom, 2 of them are Japan and China, and the other one being the Union State. The other 4 members can be members from any country. The resolutions passed within the Special Assembly are also non-binding, but it does permit a nation to intervene in another nation's affairs should something wrong happens within a nation's borders and the Special Assembly gives permission to intervene.

No significant discussion concerning vetoes are undertaken, both sides realizing just how powerful the potential of a veto could be. They desire a place of discussion, not a place for grandstanding and bad press.

The Tanegashima Space Center is officially inaugurated.

After years of tense discussions and research, the Tanegashima Space Center is finally finished. The opening ceremony was met with much fanfare and jubilation across Japan, with both the Emperor and Prime Minister making separate speeches on the importance of Space Exploration for the Japanese people. The Space Center also has the honour of being the first space center ever built, beating the rumored space center in Algeria by a couple of months. It is a great achievement for the Japanese people and construction of the first space rockets are being built right after it's inauguration.

EDIT:

The various secret police integrated.

It had been a long time coming, everyone knows that by now. But the Kempeitai, Tokkeitai and Tokko was formally dissolved in 1954. Their offices are closed off and files released into the public domain. Their agents, office workers, and other bureaucrats fired and rehired into government agencies that demand much stronger standards for transparency and ethics. While there were some desperate defenses mounted by the former secret police officers when the day comes. Up to barricading their offices from the incoming eviction wave, public pressure and turning opinion within the Japanese public forced them to accept their fate. Now with their buildings barred up, some of them even being transformed into parks, the fate of these former secret police officers, once feared throughout Japan, are now just working as clerks in the gigantic cog that is the Japanese bureaucracy, or being retrained in actual Military Policing methods in the case for the Kempeitai and Tokkeitai.
 
Last edited:

christopher_sni

Active member
I have been thinking about the recent discussions regarding carrier and VTOLs. I propose the development of a Escort Carrier with the same dimensions of one of the new container ships. Unlike a Fleet Carrier, this vessel will only have space for Helicopters and VTOLS.

Pros:

1. Can be built in any shipyard that produces Container Vessels
2. Can be used in peacetime for Search and Rescue, Offshore Construction, Disaster Relief or Peacekeeping.
3. Can travel anywhere that a Container Ship can.
4. Cheaper cost to build and maintain and the design can be exported to various members.

Cons:

1. Not as well armored as a regular carrier.
2. Carrying capacity is limited so more ships will be needed.
3. Unable to handle jet fighters unless an emergency landing.
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
There are also very angry outpourings from the American embassy in Tokyo once they heard news about our dealings in Puerto Rico and Cuba.
Some local governments also utilized asbestos for some of the buildings, citing it's cost effectiveness and ability to trap heat effectively. This is definitely a wise move and will not backfire in any way.
I'm quite surprised that there's not a lot of reaction from these two points. Thought you might be a bit concerned or something.
 

Alias

Bean Daddy
Moderator
A bit concerned but didn’t really have anything else to say.
 

Eliar

Well-known member
I'm quite surprised that there's not a lot of reaction from these two points. Thought you might be a bit concerned or something.
I am having kitten fits and will definately NOT include hanging the ones responsible by their fingernails next turn :p
 
World Events, 1954

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
3 January: Italian Broadcaster RAI opens it’s transmissions. It became the premier radio station for all of Italy and one of the few Syndicalist radio stations that transmit abroad.

10 January: Union Airways Flight 571, a UA De Havilland Comet disintegrated in midair due to metal fatigue. All 35 people are killed.

12 January: Avalanches in Austria kills more than 200

14 January: Marilyn Monroe marries Joe Dimaggio at the San Francisco City Hall

20 January: The National Negro Network, a radio based service exclusive for African Americans, was established. It has 46 Radio Member stations.

25 January: The first ever nuclear submarine, the Revolution, was launched on Brest, it was inaugurated by Daniel Guérin himself.

10 February: The second ever nuclear submarine, the Republic, was launched in Liverpool, and it’s launching ceremony was broadcasted widely across the TV stations across Britain.

20 February: The first mass vaccination of children against Polio happened in Honolulu, Hawaii.

1 March: Japanese officials announced that the country has developed a Hydrogen bomb.

2 March: The Puerto Rico incident, Puerto Rican nationalists infiltrated and shot several congressmen during a session in the Union State Congress. Injuring 5, they killed themselves before the police could apprehend them.

9 March: American journalists produces a 30 minute see it now documentary, it was titled A Report on Senator Joseph McCarthy

13 March: Vietnamese forces conducted an exercise of logistics near the city of Dien Bien Phu, it was an exercise to test just how difficult it would be to move military logistics in tropical rainforests and hills.

27 March: Japan releases footage of the Hydrogen Bomb explosion, this time, the bomb was detonated underground within Siberia.

30 March: The first ever operational subway line in Canada was opened in Toronto.

1 April: Congress authorizes President Huey Long to construct a Union State Airforce Academy in Colorado

4 April: Legendary conductor Arturo Toscanini experiences a memory lapse mid concert, he announces his retirement after the concert’s end, never to play symphony ever again.

8 April: A Canadian military plane and a Canadian Passenger plane collided near Saskatchewan, killing 37 people.

11 April: This day was denoted as the most boring day in the 20th century, as nothing significant is known to have happened on this day.

14 April: A Syndicalist spy ring in Australia is unraveled.

16 April: President Huey Long announces a willingness to ‘triple our military expenditure’ as a result of both the Syndicalist, and Japanese presence within the Caribbean.

20 April: Skyengine Laboratories, a company founded by a former aircraft engineer in Nakajima, was founded, it focuses on building Plane Engines for any customers interested. Shin Meiwa Industries becomes the company’s first customer and major investor.

26 April: Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai is released in Japan.

22 April: Senator Joseph Mccarthy begins hearings, investigating whether or not the Union State Military is being ‘soft’ on Syndicalism.

28 April: France and Britain officially adopt the FN FAL as their main service rifle.

1 May: The Kyushu J7W3, the last iteration of the jet fighter, was formally adopted into the Imperial Japanese Airforce, it features 4 inlets where 4 250 lb bombs or 4 early air to air missiles could be placed.

5 May: The Nile Water and Trade Economic Community was born, taking inspiration from it’s East Asian counterpart, representatives from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia and Egypt agreed to form a common standard for tariffs for all the ports within their countries, and also agreed to not build any dams that would massively impact the flow of the river nile. Proposals for the Aswan dam are deemed not severely impactful to the flow of the river.

8 May: The Asian Football Confederation is formed in Manilla, Philippines.

14 May: After years of development, Mitsubishi unveils the Mitsubishi Skyjet 100. The first major widebody airliner made in Japan. Both Japan Airlines and Nippon Helicopter and Aeroplane expressed interest, with Qantas and Philippine Air Lines signing contracts for the aircraft as well.

15 May: The Latin Union is created in the conference of Madrid. It’s initial member countries include France, Iberia, Italy, and Romania.

17 May: Brown v Board of Education. The US Supreme Court rules that segregated schools are constitutional, despite promises from Huey Long that the government would ensure that ‘separated but equal would be true to its spirit and letter.’ Riots within African American neighborhoods ensued.

22 May: The Common Nordic Labour Market act is signed. With a notable exception being Finland.

3 June: The Philippines and Siam formally joins ASEAN.

9 June: Mccarthyism, General J. Lawton Collins, during a congressional hearing. Lashes out against Senator Mccarthy, saying ‘Have you, at long last, no decency?’

15 June: The Union of European Football Associations, or UEFA, was formed in Basel, Switzerland.

22 June: Sarah Mae Flemming was expelled from a bus in North Carolina, for sitting in a whites only section.

27 June: The world’s first nuclear power station opens up near Tokyo, Japan.

1 July: The Common Nordic Market Act came into effect.

4 July: Food rationing in the Union of Britain ends. Meats in Britain can now be purchased as much as desired.

15 July: The Skyjet 100 prototype takes its first maiden flight.

29 July: The Seven Swords, the first of three volumes in Saneatsu Mushanokoji’s epic, Tales from a lost time, is published. It features an unusual cast of a Female Main Character, A parallel to a Samurai Warrior, an archer from the mountains, a brute from the Far North, and a charismatic trader from the southern islands. It becomes an instant hit.

31 July: Japanese expedition to K2. Japanese mountaineers and former soldiers managed to climb the summit of the second highest mountain in the world.

6 August: The first issue of Sports Illustrated is published in the United States.

23 August: The Lockheed C-130 Hercules makes its maiden flight in Burbank, California.

3 September: The last episode of the Lone Ranger radio program was broadcasted, after 2,596 episodes over a period of 21 years.

10 September: A dead body was found in an unusual place, at an unusual time within the new apartment buildings of Tokyo, Metropolitan Police couldn’t make heads or tails concerning the death of the person. Corresponding evidence includes a burnt pile of what looked to be official paperwork of the Yasuda Zaibatsu and a carving on his body which spells ‘Truth always comes out.’

15 September: Black Wednesday, severe delays in flights, due to bad weather, occur along the East Coast of America.

17 September: William Golding’s Lord of the Flies was published in London.

26 September: Japanese Ferry Toya Maru sank in the Tsugaru Strait. More than 1,100 people are killed, 7 other ships are wrecked, and at least 9 people are seriously injured.

30 September: The Revolution and the Republic officially enters service in both the French and British navies respectively.

11 October: Hurricane Hazel hits Haiti, killing 1,000

18 October: Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo (later name Sony) announces the development of the first commercial transistor radio. The TR-54. It went on sale next month.

26 October: A Syndicalist spy attempts to assassinate Egyptian General Gamal Abdel Nasser, the attempt ended in failure.

3 November: The first ever film of Godzilla appears in Tokyo.

12 November: Vietnam and Laos joins ASEAN.

13 November: Britain defeats France in the first ever Rugby World Cup. In a stadium with around 30,000 spectators.

23 November: The Nikkei Stock Average has, for the first time, peaked once more, surpassing it’s previous peak of 350.65 points. The first time the stock index has surpassed it’s level after Black Monday.

30 November: In Sylacauga, Alabama. a fragment of a meteorite hits the roof of a house and injures a sleeping woman. It is the first documented case of an object from outer space hitting a person.

1 December: Investigation on the mysterious person’s death in Tokyo continues, With Metropolitan Police authorities raiding Yasuda Zaibatsu offices for evidence, despite stronger than expected resistance from the Zaibatsu’s clerks.

2 December: The US Senate votes 67-22 to condemn Joseph Mccarthy for ‘Conduct that brings the Senate into Dishonour and Disrepute.’

23 December: The first ever successful Kidney Transplant was performed in Paris, France.

31 December: The UDT/SEAL, a special operations branch of the Navy, was officially formed and integrated into Japan’s special forces command.

@King Kūruš. Eat your heart out.
 
Last edited:

Eliar

Well-known member
Oh.

Civil Rights are dead in the water in this timeline for the US then. Long Live Jim Crow!?

Wonder who the higher up serial killer is?

And *Checks* How will the world first Super Woman be called I wonder :p
 
Top Bottom